Don’t Run from AAC!

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Do you have children on your caseload who use an Augmentative Alternative Communication (AAC) device?  It can be pretty overwhelming working with AAC especially if you have a full caseload.  Here are some suggestions to help make their therapy meaningful and beneficial for everyone involved.   Don’t reinvent the wheel: First make sure you are… Read more »

Work-life Balance for CFs: Staying True to Yourself, for You and Your Students

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“I don’t even recognize my own face in the mirror,” my graduate school classmate said to me, as we packed up our things after another late night of SOAP notes and studying. I could relate. It wasn’t our tired eyes and dehydrated skin that she was referring to (a result of exhaustion and living on… Read more »

My Lunch Bunch Experience

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As I begin another school year, I like to think about what has been successful in the past and how I can improve on what has already been working.  This year, I am thinking specifically about the Lunch Bunch Social Skills group that I implemented a few years ago, first at the high school and… Read more »

Colorful Speech with Color Me Fluent

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How can you get your students on board and excited about Color Me Fluent?  If you’ve ever had the privilege of hearing Alice Anne G. Farley speak about her fluency therapy, you would hear just how she can make fluency sessions come alive!  We need to do the same.  Here are some helpful tips and… Read more »

Behavior Management: Speech Language Therapy

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You’ve done it – you’ve successfully completed last year’s requirements, lazily basked in the sun all summer, and returned to school ready to take on the new year. Your pencils are sharpened, your files are color-coded, and your outfit is picked out. You’re eager to meet your students and begin therapy, never stopping to consider… Read more »

Fun Speech Exercises for Kids Who Have Trouble with the “R” Sound

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The /r/ sound can be tough for some children to pronounce. It’s a voiced sound, produced by the vibration of the vocal cord. If it’s at the beginning of a word, the tongue pulls back a bit and raises at the tip, without touching the roof of the mouth. But if /r/ is elsewhere in… Read more »