Exercises Kids Can Do for Different Parts of the Body Using Foam Rollers

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Sometimes called frollers, foam rollers are well known to therapists and athletes. They are sold in sporting goods and department stores, and come in various shapes and sizes – the most common being 36 inches long and six inches round. They look a little like short, stubby pool noodles, but they are shorter and denser…. Read more »

The Best Therapy Tools to Have for Your Classroom

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School can be overwhelming for children who have trouble focusing or have specialized sensory needs. While the situation will differ according to each student, there are some basic items to have on hand in your classroom so you’re prepared to help each youngster do their individual best and achieve their full potential. Therapy Balls Originally… Read more »

Gym Class Activities for Children with Poor Motor Skills

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Through games, sports, and play, students can continuously develop their motor skills to help make them more successful both inside and outside the classroom. Use these related tips to boost your OT regime. Core Strengthening Without a stable core, children may struggle to sit still at a desk or to carry out fine motor tasks…. Read more »

Fun Speech Exercises for Kids Who Have Trouble with the “R” Sound

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The /r/ sound can be tough for some children to pronounce. It’s a voiced sound, produced by the vibration of the vocal cord. If it’s at the beginning of a word, the tongue pulls back a bit and raises at the tip, without touching the roof of the mouth. But if /r/ is elsewhere in… Read more »

The Importance of Promoting Upper Body Strength From a Young Age

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Upper body strength is critical throughout a person’s life. Effective arm movement and control are possible only when trunk strength and stability are good – and a stable core provides a solid base of support from which both the arms and legs are free to move with precision and control. Postural Control is Key Good… Read more »

Getting Ready to Go Back to School as a School-Based Occupational Therapist

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It’s that time of year again. (How did that happen?) School starts soon, and it’s time to get organized and get to know the students you’ll be working with when you resume your school-based OT practice for 2017/18. One key to your success will be getting to know your students and fellow education team members…. Read more »

How to Help Antisocial Children in Your Classroom

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It’s normal for children to exhibit both positive and negative behavior at different times as they age and develop. But some students display high levels of antisocial tendencies – in some cases, as early as the age of three. Antisocial behavior is manageable, but early intervention is key. Research has concluded that, if left untreated… Read more »

What Did You Just Say? Tips to Take Care of Mumbling

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Sometimes, children have all the sounds they need in their verbal inventory, but they still can’t be understood when they speak because they mumble. And their compromised intelligibility can have a significant negative impact on their lives, inside and outside the classroom. What Causes Mumbling? There’s a difference between articulation disorders in general and mumbling…. Read more »

Common Factors That Could Be Affecting Handwriting Skills

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Poor handwriting is one of the most common OT referrals among primary school students. Children may never have mastered such fundamental pre-writing skills as sizing, formation, construction, alignment or spacing. A number of factors can affect handwriting skills development. These include: Attention to task: Children can’t sit still or keep their eyes on task, or… Read more »

How to Fix “Toe Walking” Before It’s Too Late

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More than half of children who toe walk will stop doing so on their own by the age of five. But for those who continue to experience this condition – and to curb the problem before it’s too late – there are some highly effective steps that therapists, as well as parents and other caregivers,… Read more »